Cleos-Creations

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2401 S. Stemmons Freeway Suite 2032

Lewisville, Texas 75067

4800 S Hulen Street

Fort Worth, TX 76132 

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July Newsletter 2019

 

 

 

 

Cleo’s Creations

NEWS LETTER

A Publication for Cleo’s Creations --- Volume 1 Number 7 – July 1, 2019 for Trinity Habitat for Humanity --- Volume 7 Number 7 – July 1, 2010

 

 

Cleo’s Creations Art Gallery, in Lewisville, just completed a successful 3 day Art Walk. Twelve artists participated in the activities in this fun filled festival.--- food, music and more.

 

These events take place, in Lewisville, the third Saturday of every month. Similar activities take place at Cleo’s Creations at Hulen Mall in Ft. Worth, every fourth Saturday of the month.

 

Come join us at a location near you. You’ll be surprised at the quality and talent these two galleries now offer. Young, promising artists and mature, award winning artists. Come see for yourself.

                   

 

 

                                              Happy July 4th

 

 

 

A Government Concept Far Ahead of it’s Time, and Written to Last!

Our founding Fathers where a special selection of unique individuals… each with special skills that helped to produced a constitutional form of government exceptional in its approach. And while each had varied and remarkable abilities, they all had one thing in common… they all believed in individual freedom and the dignity of man.

 

One of those men was Ben Franklin. His exceptional people skills and political savvy helped this young country gain recognition in the world community. In fact he spent years in Europe, mostly England, nursing the interests of the “colonies” as they were known early on. In the beginning, it was his astute political persuasion that was instrumental in urging France to fight on our side against England in the “Fight for Freedom” also known as the Revolutionary War. He remained very active in the international arena until it got too difficult for him to travel the long distances required.

 

However, he was not always so set against the British, in fact while an early member of the Continental Congress his early leanings where in question. It is hard to pinpoint precisely when America, and Franklin, crossed the threshold of deciding that complete independence from Britain was necessary and desirable. It is even difficult to determine when that tipping point came for other specific individuals. Franklin, who for ten years had juggled hope and despair that a breach could be avoided, made his own private declaration to his family during their summit at Trevose. By early July 1775, precisely one year before his fellow American patriots made their own stance official, he was ready to come out publicly.

There were many specific events that pushed Franklin across the line to rebellion: personal slights, dashed hopes, betrayals, and the increase in the number and scale of hostile British acts. But it is important to take note of the core causes of Franklin’s evolution and, by extension, that of a people he had come to exemplify.

 

When Englishmen such as his father had immigrated to a new land, they had bred a new type of people. As Franklin repeatedly stressed in letters to his son, America should not replicate the rigid ruling hierarchies of the Old World, the aristocratic structures and feudal social orders based on birth rather than merit. Instead, its strength would be its creation of a proud middling people, a class of frugal and industrious shopkeepers and tradesmen who were assertive of their rights and proud of their status.

 

Like many of these new Americans, Franklin chafed at authority, which is why he had run away from his brother’s print shop in Boston. He was not awed by established elites, whether they be the Mathers or the Penns or the peers in the House of Lords. He was cheeky in his writings and rebellious in his manner. And he had imbibed the philosophy of the new Enlightenment thinkers, who believed that liberty and tolerance were the foundation for a civil society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Franklin loved this new and unspoiled land. For a long time he had cherished a vision of imperial harmony in which Britain and America could both flourish in one great expanding empire. But he felt it would only work if Britain stopped subjugating Americans through mercantile trading rules and taxes imposed from afar. Once it was clear the Britain remained intent on subordinating its colonies, the only course left was independence.

 

The bloody Battle of Bunker Hill and the burning of Charleston, both in June 1775, further inflamed the hostility that Franklin and his fellow patriots felt toward the British. Nevertheless, most members of the Continental Congress were not quite as far down the road to revolution. Many colonial legislatures, including Pennsylvania’s, had instructed their delegates to resist any calls for independence. The captain of the cautious camp was Franklin’s long-time adversary John Dickinson, who still refrained from erecting a lightning rod on his house.

 

On July 5, Dickinson pushed through the Congress one last appeal to the king, which became known as the Olive Branch Petition. Blaming the troubles on the treachery of “irksome” and “delusive” ministers, it “beseeched” the king to come to America’s rescue. The Congress also passed a Declaration of the Causes and Necessity for Taking Up Arms, in which it proclaimed “that we mean not to dissolve that union which has so long and so happily subsisted between us, and which we sincerely wish to see restored.”

 

Like the other delegates, Franklin agreed for the sake of consensus to sign the Olive Branch Petition. But he made his own rebellious sentiments public the same day. The outlet he chose was quite odd: a letter to his long-time London friend and fellow printer, William Strahan. No longer addressing him as “dear Straney,” he wrote in cold and calculating fury: Mr. Strahan,

You are a Member of Parliament, and one of that Majority which has doomed my country to destruction. You have begun to burn our towns, and murder our people. Look upon your hands! They are stained with blood of your relations! You and I were long friends: You are now my enemy, and I am, Yours, B. Franklin.

 

What made the famous letter especially odd was that Franklin allowed it to be circulated and publicized – but he never sent it. Instead, it was merely an artifact for making his sentiment clear to his fellow Americans.

 

Another letter, to Joseph Priestley, he lamented that the Olive Branch Petition would be rejected, and offered a glimpse into Franklin’s workday and the mood of relative frugality in the colonies:

“My time was never more fully employed. In the morning at 6, I am at the committee of safety, appointed by the assembly to put the province in a state of defense; which committee holds till near 9, when I am at congress, and that sits till after 4 in the afternoon … Great frugality and great industry are now become fashionable here: Gentlemen who used to entertain with two or three courses, pride themselves now in treating with simple beef and pudding. By these means, and the stoppage of our consumptive trade with Britain, we shall be better able to pay our voluntary taxes for the support of our troops.”

 

Liberated by his private break with his son and his public break with Strahan, Franklin became one of the most ardent opponents of Britain in the Continental Congress. He worked tirelessly for the cause of the colonies and drafted the first Articles of Confederation Plan, the forerunner of the Declaration of Independence. His writings and oratory were so strong and accusatory against Britain that John Adams could not suppress a slight resentment that the British believe that American opposition was “wholly owing” to Franklin, “and I suppose their scribblers will attribute the temper and proceedings of this Congress to him.” It was because of his fervor and bluntness that the writing of the Declaration of Independence was passed to the representative from Virginia, one of the most “free thinkers” of the day, Thomas Jefferson. However, that didn’t stop Franklin from offering input every chance he got.

 

Have a great July 4th, and remember the men that gave “every fiber of their being” for this new country, this wonderful America.

 

 

A thug and his girlfriend were strolling down the street late at night, holding hands and gazing into shop windows. Passing a jewelry store, the girlfriend spotted a shiny ring. “Oh!” she exclaimed. “I’d just love to have that.”

 

The thug looked around and without a word threw a brick through the window, reached in and grabbed the ring. “There you go, baby,” he said. The girl was impressed. They walked on until she spotted a leather coat in another window. “Wow,” she said. “It sure is beautiful.”

 

“Hold on,” said the thug. He threw another brick through the window and grabbed the coat and handed it to his girlfriend. A few blocks later she spotted an attractive pair of boots. “Oh –“she began, but the thug interrupted. “C’mon, baby,” he said. “You think I’m made of bricks?”

 

Attitude is important, pick a good one.

 

Share your dreams to make them come true.

 

Always put people before things.

 

“Thanks” and “love” are two words not used enough.

My wife, a fight attendant for a major airline, watched one day as a passenger overloaded with bags tried to stuff his belongings in the overhead bins. Finally, she informed him that he would have to check the oversized luggage.

 

“When I fly other airlines,” he said irritably, “I don’t have this problem.” My wife smiled and replied, “When you fly other airlines, I don’t have this problem either.”

 

Everyone at the company I worked for dressed up for Halloween. One fellow’s costume stumped us. He simply wore slacks and a white T-shirt with a large 98.6 printed across the front in glitter. When someone finally asked what he was supposed to be, he replied, “I’m a temp.”

 

Desperate for registered nurses, my colleagues and I in hospital administration often share ideas to recruit employees. Out of exasperation, I made a joking plea to two of my colleagues, asking them to send me six nurses from each of their hospitals.

 

That request prompted one of them to suggest a unique solution: “Send six nurses to the top three names on the list of hospital administrators, and then send your request to five other colleagues. In 14 days you will have received 1567 nurses.”

 

Tommy, my husband, was playing golf with our town’s fire chief when he hit the ball into the rough. As Tommy headed for the brush to find his ball, the fire chief warned, “Be careful, the rattlesnakes are out.”

 

The chief explained that calls had been coming in all week requesting assistance with removing snakes. “You’ve got to be kidding,” Tommy replied in astonishment. “People actually call you to help them with rattlesnakes? What do you say to them?” “Well,” said the chief, “the first thing I ask is, ‘Is it on fire?’”

 

Three elderly sisters are sitting in the living room, chatting about various things. One sister says, “You know, I’m getting really forgetful. This morning, I was standing at the top of the stairs, and I couldn’t remember whether I had just come up or was about to go down.”

 

The second sister says, “You think that’s bad? The other day, I was sitting on the edge of my bed, and I couldn’t remember whether I was going to bed or just getting up.”

 

The third sister smiles smugly. “Well, my memory’s just as good as it’s always been, knock on wood.” She raps on the table. “You sit still. I’ll answer the door.”

 

Next Special Event in Lewisville

July 20th - -12 pm to 8 pm

 

 

 

Next Special Event at Hulen Mall

July 27th - -12 pm to 8 pm

 

 

Watch future publications for more details about

ART ACTIVITIES

 

at both

Cleos Creations locations

Fort Worth, Hulen Mall next to Macy’s, lower level

And

Music City Mall, Lewisville

 

 

Come see us any day

We are open from

11:00 am ‘til 8:00 pm Monday thru Saturday

and

12:00 to 6:00

On Sunday

 

 

We encourage you to visit either location, Music City Mall in Lewisville or Hulen Mall in Fort Worth. We know you will be pleasantly surprised at the quality and quantity of the Original Art available

.

 

Do yourself a pleasant favor and walk through our gallery, created by 20 passionate artists.

You’ll feel better

 

 

 

 

Cleo’s Creations

NEWS LETTER

A Publication for Cleo’s Creations --- Volume 1 Number 7 – July 1, 2019

 for Trinity Habitat for Humanity --- Volume 7 Number 7 – July 1, 2010

 

 

Cleo’s Creations Art Gallery, in Lewisville, just completed a successful 3 day Art Walk. Twelve artists participated in the activities in this fun filled festival.--- food, music and more.

 

These events take place, in Lewisville, the third Saturday of every month. Similar activities take place at Cleo’s Creations at Hulen Mall in Ft. Worth, every fourth Saturday of the month.

 

Come join us at a location near you. You’ll be surprised at the quality and talent these two galleries now offer. Young, promising artists and mature, award winning artists. Come see for yourself.

                      Happy July

                    4th

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Government Concept Far Ahead of it’s Time, and Written to Last!

Our founding Fathers where a special selection of unique individuals… each with special skills that helped to produced a constitutional form of government exceptional in its approach. And while each had varied and remarkable abilities, they all had one thing in common… they all believed in individual freedom and the dignity of man.

 

One of those men was Ben Franklin. His exceptional people skills and political savvy helped this young country gain recognition in the world community. In fact he spent years in Europe, mostly England, nursing the interests of the “colonies” as they were known early on. In the beginning, it was his astute political persuasion that was instrumental in urging France to fight on our side against England in the “Fight for Freedom” also known as the Revolutionary War. He remained very active in the international arena until it got too difficult for him to travel the long distances required.

 

However, he was not always so set against the British, in fact while an early member of the Continental Congress his early leanings where in question. It is hard to pinpoint precisely when America, and Franklin, crossed the threshold of deciding that complete independence from Britain was necessary and desirable. It is even difficult to determine when that tipping point came for other specific individuals. Franklin, who for ten years had juggled hope and despair that a breach could be avoided, made his own private declaration to his family during their summit at Trevose. By early July 1775, precisely one year before his fellow American patriots made their own stance official, he was ready to come out publicly.

There were many specific events that pushed Franklin across the line to rebellion: personal slights, dashed hopes, betrayals, and the increase in the number and scale of hostile British acts. But it is important to take note of the core causes of Franklin’s evolution and, by extension, that of a people he had come to exemplify.

 

When Englishmen such as his father had immigrated to a new land, they had bred a new type of people. As Franklin repeatedly stressed in letters to his son, America should not replicate the rigid ruling hierarchies of the Old World, the aristocratic structures and feudal social orders based on birth rather than merit. Instead, its strength would be its creation of a proud middling people, a class of frugal and industrious shopkeepers and tradesmen who were assertive of their rights and proud of their status.

 

Like many of these new Americans, Franklin chafed at authority, which is why he had run away from his brother’s print shop in Boston. He was not awed by established elites, whether they be the Mathers or the Penns or the peers in the House of Lords. He was cheeky in his writings and rebellious in his manner. And he had imbibed the philosophy of the new Enlightenment thinkers, who believed that liberty and tolerance were the foundation for a civil society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Franklin loved this new and unspoiled land. For a long time he had cherished a vision of imperial harmony in which Britain and America could both flourish in one great expanding empire. But he felt it would only work if Britain stopped subjugating Americans through mercantile trading rules and taxes imposed from afar. Once it was clear the Britain remained intent on subordinating its colonies, the only course left was independence.

 

The bloody Battle of Bunker Hill and the burning of Charleston, both in June 1775, further inflamed the hostility that Franklin and his fellow patriots felt toward the British. Nevertheless, most members of the Continental Congress were not quite as far down the road to revolution. Many colonial legislatures, including Pennsylvania’s, had instructed their delegates to resist any calls for independence. The captain of the cautious camp was Franklin’s long-time adversary John Dickinson, who still refrained from erecting a lightning rod on his house.

 

On July 5, Dickinson pushed through the Congress one last appeal to the king, which became known as the Olive Branch Petition. Blaming the troubles on the treachery of “irksome” and “delusive” ministers, it “beseeched” the king to come to America’s rescue. The Congress also passed a Declaration of the Causes and Necessity for Taking Up Arms, in which it proclaimed “that we mean not to dissolve that union which has so long and so happily subsisted between us, and which we sincerely wish to see restored.”

 

Like the other delegates, Franklin agreed for the sake of consensus to sign the Olive Branch Petition. But he made his own rebellious sentiments public the same day. The outlet he chose was quite odd: a letter to his long-time London friend and fellow printer, William Strahan. No longer addressing him as “dear Straney,” he wrote in cold and calculating fury: Mr. Strahan,

You are a Member of Parliament, and one of that Majority which has doomed my country to destruction. You have begun to burn our towns, and murder our people. Look upon your hands! They are stained with blood of your relations! You and I were long friends: You are now my enemy, and I am, Yours, B. Franklin.

 

What made the famous letter especially odd was that Franklin allowed it to be circulated and publicized – but he never sent it. Instead, it was merely an artifact for making his sentiment clear to his fellow Americans.

 

Another letter, to Joseph Priestley, he lamented that the Olive Branch Petition would be rejected, and offered a glimpse into Franklin’s workday and the mood of relative frugality in the colonies:

“My time was never more fully employed. In the morning at 6, I am at the committee of safety, appointed by the assembly to put the province in a state of defense; which committee holds till near 9, when I am at congress, and that sits till after 4 in the afternoon … Great frugality and great industry are now become fashionable here: Gentlemen who used to entertain with two or three courses, pride themselves now in treating with simple beef and pudding. By these means, and the stoppage of our consumptive trade with Britain, we shall be better able to pay our voluntary taxes for the support of our troops.”

 

Liberated by his private break with his son and his public break with Strahan, Franklin became one of the most ardent opponents of Britain in the Continental Congress. He worked tirelessly for the cause of the colonies and drafted the first Articles of Confederation Plan, the forerunner of the Declaration of Independence. His writings and oratory were so strong and accusatory against Britain that John Adams could not suppress a slight resentment that the British believe that American opposition was “wholly owing” to Franklin, “and I suppose their scribblers will attribute the temper and proceedings of this Congress to him.” It was because of his fervor and bluntness that the writing of the Declaration of Independence was passed to the representative from Virginia, one of the most “free thinkers” of the day, Thomas Jefferson. However, that didn’t stop Franklin from offering input every chance he got.

 

Have a great July 4th, and remember the men that gave “every fiber of their being” for this new country, this wonderful America.

 

 

A thug and his girlfriend were strolling down the street late at night, holding hands and gazing into shop windows. Passing a jewelry store, the girlfriend spotted a shiny ring. “Oh!” she exclaimed. “I’d just love to have that.”

 

The thug looked around and without a word threw a brick through the window, reached in and grabbed the ring. “There you go, baby,” he said. The girl was impressed. They walked on until she spotted a leather coat in another window. “Wow,” she said. “It sure is beautiful.”

 

“Hold on,” said the thug. He threw another brick through the window and grabbed the coat and handed it to his girlfriend. A few blocks later she spotted an attractive pair of boots. “Oh –“she began, but the thug interrupted. “C’mon, baby,” he said. “You think I’m made of bricks?”

 

Attitude is important, pick a good one.

 

Share your dreams to make them come true.

 

Always put people before things.

 

“Thanks” and “love” are two words not used enough.

My wife, a fight attendant for a major airline, watched one day as a passenger overloaded with bags tried to stuff his belongings in the overhead bins. Finally, she informed him that he would have to check the oversized luggage.

 

“When I fly other airlines,” he said irritably, “I don’t have this problem.” My wife smiled and replied, “When you fly other airlines, I don’t have this problem either.”

 

Everyone at the company I worked for dressed up for Halloween. One fellow’s costume stumped us. He simply wore slacks and a white T-shirt with a large 98.6 printed across the front in glitter. When someone finally asked what he was supposed to be, he replied, “I’m a temp.”

 

Desperate for registered nurses, my colleagues and I in hospital administration often share ideas to recruit employees. Out of exasperation, I made a joking plea to two of my colleagues, asking them to send me six nurses from each of their hospitals.

 

That request prompted one of them to suggest a unique solution: “Send six nurses to the top three names on the list of hospital administrators, and then send your request to five other colleagues. In 14 days you will have received 1567 nurses.”

 

Tommy, my husband, was playing golf with our town’s fire chief when he hit the ball into the rough. As Tommy headed for the brush to find his ball, the fire chief warned, “Be careful, the rattlesnakes are out.”

 

The chief explained that calls had been coming in all week requesting assistance with removing snakes. “You’ve got to be kidding,” Tommy replied in astonishment. “People actually call you to help them with rattlesnakes? What do you say to them?” “Well,” said the chief, “the first thing I ask is, ‘Is it on fire?’”

 

Three elderly sisters are sitting in the living room, chatting about various things. One sister says, “You know, I’m getting really forgetful. This morning, I was standing at the top of the stairs, and I couldn’t remember whether I had just come up or was about to go down.”

 

The second sister says, “You think that’s bad? The other day, I was sitting on the edge of my bed, and I couldn’t remember whether I was going to bed or just getting up.”

 

The third sister smiles smugly. “Well, my memory’s just as good as it’s always been, knock on wood.” She raps on the table. “You sit still. I’ll answer the door.”

 

Next Special Event in Lewisville

July 20th - -12 pm to 8 pm

 

 

 

Next Special Event at Hulen Mall

July 27th - -12 pm to 8 pm

 

 

Watch future publications for more details about

ART ACTIVITIES

 

at both

Cleos Creations locations

Fort Worth, Hulen Mall next to Macy’s, lower level

And

Music City Mall, Lewisville

 

 

Come see us any day

We are open from

11:00 am ‘til 8:00 pm Monday thru Saturday

and

12:00 to 6:00

On Sunday

 

 

We encourage you to visit either location, Music City Mall in Lewisville or Hulen Mall in Fort Worth. We know you will be pleasantly surprised at the quality and quantity of the Original Art available

.

 

Do yourself a pleasant favor and walk through our gallery, created by 20 passionate artists.

You’ll feel better

 

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